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Peace or Pit

Life. Life happens. Have you ever come out of a foggy situation, tattered, a little bruised, (metaphorically speaking)? Your heart aches with that familiar ache of disappointment in someone’s behavior?  (Or is the behavior yours?)

Their pain, jealousy, hatred, and insecurity causing them to act out in anger. Pain and anger are very intricately linked, that the dividing line fades when actions are applied. If these words resonate even with some small hint of recognition, then you too can relate to Joseph of the Bible.

Joseph, an incredible story–the events that groomed him, the people that mocked him, and the God Who delivered him. One verse dances off the page as it defines his circumstance. Genesis 37:4 “When the brothers saw that their father loved him (Joseph) more than any of them, they hated him and could not speak a kind word to him.”

The word used, they “could not speak a kind word to him” seems to get lost in many of our bible translations. In the Hebrew, the word (kind) is shalom. The brothers due to their jealousy and hatred could not speak peace to Joseph. Peace, meaning health, prosperity, blessing and amazingly so, it can be rendered–safe.

Noticing on in the story of the brothers (turn tormentors) they see Joseph from afar.  Their deceitful plan is forever etched in history. First, they plan to kill him. Nope too harsh, (don’t we ALL rationalize). Then they found what was convenient. A deep well. When in haste convenience seems to always trump wisdom!

It says they stripped him of his robe, one of many things that ticked them off, let’s start with the robe, the outward sign of our jealousy.  They attempted to remove the evidence of his favored relationship–the gift from their father. I believe this was not done in silence. I bet there was a lot of taunting going on. Rude comments, jesting, a jab here and shove there. Then the final shove, leading to pit dwelling. Then their brother was sold into slavery.

Jealousy and hatred withhold peace. May we think of our own lives: Are we speaking peace to and over others, (regardless of how brief our time is with them). Are we allowing them a safe place in our life? Are we doing our part to help them prosper, stay healthy? Or not?  Is there someone who has what we want? Oh, it may not be the enduring love of a father, but perhaps our jealousy stems elsewhere.  At what cost does our lack of peace affect others? Is it worth it?  Are we giving them the gift of peace or throwing them in a pit?   (Ouch!)

I have heard it said, “Bitterness is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.” It actually hurts us in the long run. The story goes on that Joseph becomes highly successful while the brothers and family live in feminine. They ultimately end up going to Joseph for their very survival.  So, who was it that ended up in the pit?  The brothers or Joseph?

The Pastor of Hebrews exhorts, “Work at living in peace with everyone, and work at living a holy life ” (Hebrews 12:14a, NLT). Yes, work it WILL be. It won’t be easy and not pretty at times. Yet peace is what we are called to.  Paul states in Galatians that the fruit of the Spirit–the qualities of having Jesus in our life are “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, faithfulness, and self-control” (5:22,23).  

Oh Jesus, we invite You, we need You, live in and through us! May it begin with us. May we be Your ambassadors of peace. 

Peace or a pit?  For us and them.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24)

Anticipation of Him

In the final days and moments before Christ’s death, Jesus instructs Peter and John “Go and make preparations for us to eat the Passover” (Luke 22:8).  Jesus goes on to explain the plan, and the disciples go and do as He says.  This, the beginning of an incredible time between the disciples and the Lord. 

Preparation.

Joshua too gave preparation plans.  They were at the edge of the Jordan River, ready to cross over into the Promised Land.  Men were sent to each encampment telling the Israelites that when they saw the priests with the ark, they were to move out and follow it, (but keep your distance) “then you will know which way to go, since you have never been this way before” (3:2-4).  Joshua tells the people, “Consecrate yourselves for tomorrow the LORD will do amazing things among you” (v5).  The priests and the Ark (God’s presence) were to stand in the Jordan and eventually remained standing in the middle until everyone was on the other side. God parted the river, allowing His people to cross over to the much awaited, highly anticipated, it’s finally yours–Promised Land.

Preparation and positioning.

Other instances when folks prepared?   Noah (enough said).  David, bringing the Ark back (Take 2) he prepared and implemented the instructions (Ex 25:13-15; Nu 4:15; 1 Chron 15:15; 2 Samuel 6). And “the LORD gave him rest from all his enemies” (2 Samuel 7:1b).  Jesus, He told the disciples to stay put and wait for the Presence and the power (Acts 1-2).

This preparing for God, has the Hebrew picture of adjusting.  Picture if you will– straightening your shirt.  Brushing the hair out of your eyes. Patting the dust off your pants. Standing ready. Head bowed. Possibly even taking your shoes off–for this is holy ground.  Jesus and the disciples, their preparation carries the same exact meaning, to make ready, to adjust. The disciples, through obedience, adjusted their plan, their direction, their focus. The opposite of prepare?  Neglect.  It even goes to the extreme as to overlook, NOT by accident, but intentionally ignoring.

WOW! If we too had such anticipation–excitement for God to move in our midst! What would we do to prepare?  Would we intentionally obey or ignore it? The people were called to consecrate themselves, simply put, step aside.  Step aside, withdraw from (worldly things) and step to (God). It often meant to clean up and abstain from certain behaviors. Out of obedience, perhaps we too need to adjust our plan, our direction and focus. For some of us, just showing up is a clear starter. Listen. Listen for His instruction. *

Preparation and positioning – anticipation of Him.

*Many years ago, while in a very dry place spiritually. I asked the Lord what I needed to do to prepare for Him to move in my life.  He was faithful and gave me precise instructions.  I was to get up early (O dark hundred early) and read ONLY from a certain Bible that didn’t have any (not a one) note in it. No study notes, no handwritten notes.  Just His word. Out of obedience, and anticipation, I prepared and positioned myself. I read and read and prayed. Just me and Him and His word.  After a couple of months doing this, I ended up on the floor, face down – He moved.  It was finally after six months I felt released to study again. One half of a year. One hundred and eighty-one days. Prepared and positioned in obedience.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

Find us at Inspired Fountain

Obedience

Moses. He led the people in the wilderness for forty years. Forty long dusty dry years.  The time was full of murmuring and complaining among the people.  Multiple times the narrative states Moses (and Aaron) went to their faces before God. Could it possibly be that they were ducking?  Ducking the wrath of God?  Just a silly (putting myself in the story – thought). I can’t imagine the frustration Moses may have experienced. On one occasion, they need, want–DEMAND water.  Moses goes to God. God told Moses to strike the rock and water gushed forth (Exodus 17). God miraculously provided in the wilderness.

Further in the story; another place and time in the wilderness; they needed, wanted–DEMANDED water (Numbers 20). The same exact scenario.  But was it?  Moses was given a different set of instructions. Take the staff, gather the people – speak to the rock.  Moses summoned and spoke to the people (not the rock) “Must we bring you water out of this rock?” He raised his staff and struck the rock not once–but twice.  Water did gush out. All the people, including the animals got their fill. 

God tells Moses because of this; he wasn’t going into the Promised Land. Not only did Moses take credit for the miracle water, but it is painfully interesting that God says his disobedience was “breaking faith” (ESV) and he did not esteem God holy (Numbers 20:12 & Deuteronomy 32:51-52). Moses’ behavior conveyed he was not satisfied with what God instructed and his altered actions were more forceful and terrifying, thus not giving a proper representation of God.

You shall not go.”

How harsh was that!  We all make mistakes.  Poor choices.  Stupid behavior.  But.  God gives specific instructions for–a purpose.  Often, it is detailed.  Sometimes, a general point. But it is His purpose.  We may not or cannot see it and may never know–why.

When we read throughout the bible, we see God’s redemptive story from the moment God asks the man in the Garden, “Where are you?” all the way through to last “Amen” of scripture. So much foreshadowing of Jesus.  Jesus, Himself declares the scriptures speak of Him (Luke 24:26-27).

Moses’ disobedience messed with God foretelling of Jesus.* Do not mess with the message! You see, Jesus is our living water (John 7:38) and Paul spoke about when the ancients were in the wilderness and God provided food and water (speaking both in the natural and the spirit) they “drank from the spiritual rock that accompanied them, and that rock was Christ” (1 Corinthians 10:4, BSB). Jesus, our Rock was only struck once–at Calvary. If we want the living water, we need only to “speak” to Him in prayer. 

How often do we truly consider our (dis)obedience?  Do we too alter our response by behaving differently, our choices, thinking we know better? Does it only affect us?  Our family?  Our church?  Our community?  Or perhaps delay a work of God?  Do we, like Moses, offer an improper representation of the Lord?  Do WE mess with the message!  Regardless of our frustration we are to obey.

Point to ponder.

We can’t leave Moses there.  This failure did not break his relationship with God.  He continued to lead the people forward.  He did make it. He made it to the Promised land. Fast forward, Mark 9:2-8: Mt of Transfiguration: Jesus, Peter, James and John with an appearance of Elijah and Moses. Moses initially asked to see God’s glory (Exodus 33) God said, “You can’t handle it” not here, not yet (paraphrased) but here on the Mt he saw His glory – Jesus. (John 1:14).

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

*Many things in the OT were what is known as typology.  A symbol, a representation of something yet future.

The Lifting of the Hand

The human hand, an unbelievably intricate part of the body.   Consisting of twenty-seven bones and movable joints.  With the bones, there are thirty-four muscles and over one hundred ligaments and tendons. (Pause) Look at your hand. Wiggle your fingers. Magnificent design! The hand is known to be one of the most utilized parts of our anatomy.  The hand is the gentle brush against the cheek of a peacefully sleeping infant.   The confident grip of a firm handshake. The welcoming wave to a friend across the aisle at the store.  The hand resting on a shoulder as to comfort. It is valuable moving parts to our daily lives.

The hand.

But the lifting of the hand, is where the heart connects in worship to God.  I’m not just speaking of and to the Pentecostal pews. Abraham, “I have lifted my hand to the LORD, the Most High God, Possessor of heaven and earth” (Genesis 14:22, ESV).   Out of commitment, Abram (his name not yet changed) declares, in conversation with the King of Sodom, saying a hardy “No” to his offer of the battle spoils (read the story of Sodom & Gomorrah in Genesis 18:16-33, 19:1-29). His response is due to his predetermined value, a standard (an oath) by which he was to conduct his life and that of his family – to worship God and God alone. Worship involves our lifestyle.  Our choices.  Our giving and taking. The hand.

The Israelites.  After returning from Babylonian captivity to Jerusalem, when rebuilding the walls of the city, the Law was brought out before the people. When opened and read, “Ezra blessed the LORD, the great God, and all the people answered, “Amen, Amen,” lifting up their hands. And they bowed their heads and worshiped the LORD with their faces to the ground” (Nehemiah 8:6).  Worship is our response to God’s word.

King David worshipped even in the hardship of the desert (Psalm 63). Scholars believe he may be referring to his troubles in 2 Samuel 15, when running from Absalom. “Because Your loving devotion is better than life, my lips will glorify You.  So, I will bless You as long as I live; in Your name I will lift my hands” (Psalm 63:3-4, BSB).  Worship is reaching beyond ourselves, beyond our circumstances. To Him. Regardless.

The hand.

The Hebrew words used in these verses is the open hand, (in context) the palm.  Not a fisted hand.  Not closed, holding the stuff of this world. Closed as to withhold from God. Open, conveying surrender.  Allegiance.  Honor.  Awe. 

Worship is just being overwhelmed with Who He is. “I will exalt you* my God and King and praise your name forever and ever. I will praise you every day; yes, I will praise you forever. Great is the LORD! He is most worthy of praise! No one can measure his greatness” (Psalm 145:1-3, NLT).  There are times I cannot get my hands high enough. My arms seem too short. To exalt Him over my life, over the stuff that seems big at times.  To place Him up higher – a representation of my heart’s love, my reverence to a Holy God. My hands in the direction of the One worthy of my adoration.

You? 

The lifting of the hand.

*Exalt (Hebrew, “ramam”) to extol, to raise, to lift up.  Indicating something is literally raised up high. 

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

More

Our neighborhood has a resident peacock.  Kevin doesn’t belong to anyone, (the kids named him from the bird in the movie “Up”). He lives in the thin line of woods behind the houses and often appears on rooftops.  We only hear him three to four months out of the year in the late springtime.  It is in his created design to call out for a mate.  When I hear him one block over, it makes me smile.  It reminds me of the God given desire within us – for Him.  To long for more.  More than this world can offer.

I’ve heard the phrase, “Where’s the MORE!” (In a frustrated tone) in regard to the Christian life. We all want more. More joy. More happiness. More love. Even more – stuff.  But do we want PRESENCE? That is the key. God is the key.

Some use King David’s words from Psalm 37 as if to rub a divinely ornate bottle, treating God like a genie: “Delight yourself in the LORD and He will give you the desires of your heart” (v4).  “I’m delighting God” (rub, rub) “Where’s my stuff, give me what I desire” (extensive rubbing).  Give me more.  More money.  More possessions.  More. More. More. (Ok, who just thought of the girl in the old Willy Wonka movie “I want it NOW!”).

There is a design for more. Genesis 2:7 “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life and man became a living soul.” Our bodies were made of the dust – earth – biological. The soul was not made of the earth. So, earthly things cannot quench the hunger of the soul. It is ONLY the breath of God that feeds and nurtures the spiritual man! It is divinely birthed and divinely maintained. (Brilliant design!) How often do we seek things, people, position and even events to satisfy our deep longing and cravings? Without God’s breath and presence in our lives, (His Word, see 2 Tim 3:16-17; Hebrews 4:12) we are an empty vessel. God initiated this for mankind, now we by invitation in turn – seek that breath.  We seek Him! 

HE is the more.

I love how Paul prayed over the Ephesian church, he got right to the heart of it.  He, by God’s grace and mighty power was given the privilege of spreading the Good News and to pray, “I ask Him to strengthen you by His Spirit, not a brute strength but a glorious inner strength, that Christ will live in you as you open the door and INVITE HIM in. And I ask Him that with both feet planted firmly on love, you’ll be able to take in with all Christians the extravagant dimensions of Christ’s love. Reach out and experience the breadth! Test its length! Plumb the depths! Rise to the heights! Live full lives, full in the fullness of God. God can do anything, you know, far MORE than you could ever imagine or guess or request in your wildest dreams! He does it not by pushing us around but by working within us, His Spirit deeply and gently within us” (Ephesians 3:16-20, emphasis mine – paraphrased – The Message).

MORE! Exceedingly abundantly above all. The fullness of God. Enjoy Him. Enjoy the more.

The world is looking for more. Go share – the more.  Him.

More.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we can spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

Meet Kevin the peacock

The Mountain

The hills of life often turn into a mountain of challenge. Ever feel that way? One more heap of this or that and it continues to grow. We’ve all had a mountain put in our path these last few months. I have asked the Lord to tell me about the mountain. What a journey.  I have found that if we sit at its base and do nothing, nothing is attained (goals). Nothing obtained (possessions).  Nothing is conquered (battlefield untouched).

In God’s word there are different mountains and different aspects of His character met at each mountain.

In Genesis 8-9, as the flood waters swirled around Noah, it says “God remembered Noah”. God caused a wind to blow, and the waters began to subside. Noah and crew ended up on a mountain top. There, was the place of new beginnings, the place where God’s covenant was birthed (9:9).

Genesis 22, God calls Abraham to the mountain – to sacrifice. There was the laying down of a deep love, yet in obedience – he offered.  It says, “God called out to Abraham”. He again, is faithful.  In His faithfulness He provided.

Exodus, Moses is taken to the mountain, God gives His word. His word becomes their guidance.

1 Kings 18, the show down on Mount Carmel. Elijah against the false prophets of Baal.  While all of Israel watched, (with their ever-changing allegiance).  God brought fire down, consuming not only the sacrifice, but the wood, stones, the dirt and all the drenching waters. God proved powerful.  “The LORD, He is God!” (v39)

Matthew 5, “Jesus went up on a mountainside and sat down and He began to teach them” (v1-2). For three chapters, one hundred and eleven verses He taught them. The crowds were amazed at the authority of His teaching (7:28-29).

Matthew 17, the Mt of Transfiguration. He takes Peter, James and John with Him, as He unzips His humanity, showing His glory. How powerful to be in such Presence. What a glorious invitation.  Jesus is faithful to show Himself.

Yes, each of these scenarios were with or to certain people, yet each one waves an eternal God quality at us. God is faithful. He remembers us. He remembers YOU. He calls out to us; He gives His word; He is powerful; He teaches us, and He invites us into incredible revelation of Himself.

What is YOUR mountain?  What do you need? (Point to Ponder). Get up and conquer, attain and obtain the good things of God. The remembering, calling, word, power, teaching, and revelation of God!

The mountain.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds – Hebrews 10:24).

Thrill On

Thrill seekers, they go and do just for the sake of experiencing something out of the ordinary.  They fly high, they jump as to free fall and there are those who desire speed.  Much is spent to seek this out and usually at a high price. A price for an exhilarating, yet fleeting, temporary – moment. 

I personally do not do adrenaline, nope, not me. But I have boarded a wild ride and this one causes my hands to be thrown in the air, with shouts of joy.   It does not require a ticket or weeks of planning.  BUT it does cost me something – all of me.  There is an option to get off – but I won’t. I settle in and hold on!  It offers excitement where not expected. Views I would not normally see. Experiences only this ride can give.

One of my favorite verses in all the Bible, “You thrill me, LORD, with all You have done for me!  I sing for joy because of what You have done” Psalm 92:4 (NLT).

God is my wild ride. 

You thrill me, LORD…”  conveys results of the past. The present. It also is a request for MORE!  When was the last time we got excited about God and knowing Him?

Peter writes “May grace and peace be lavished on you as you grow in the rich knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord!” (2 Peter 1:2, NET)

Peter isn’t talking about head knowledge. The word in the Greek points us to personal investment – involvement, experiencing God firsthand.  See the process Peter lays out?  Grace and peace will be attached (lavished on you) “as you grow in the rich knowledge of God…”  We are not bystanders, or observers. We are participants.  Participating and wanting – more.  Growing in personal rich knowledge of Him.

Will it always be peachy?  No.  Life alone can be a roller coaster ride with the ups and downs and hairpin turns.  The un-expectancy of it all.  But, if you long for something out of the ordinary, go for the extraordinary – ride with God Almighty. Now THAT is the wildest ride of your life. Wanting more? Invest yourself.  Read His word.  Pray.  Praise.  James wrote, “Draw near to God and He will draw near to you” (4:8a).

You thrill me, LORD!

Note: “LORD” is not me yelling (although worthy of loud declaration). In the original Hebrew text, it is YHWH, (the vowels added later).  YHWH is referred to as the “Tetragrammaton” (Greek for the 4 letters) this is indicated in many translations of the Bible when we see LORD (all caps) distinguishing it as the covenantal name, Yahweh.

Thrill on LORD, thrill on.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

Be Celebrated

We are all image bearers.  In Genesis chapter one, it says God created mankind in His own image, male and female (v27). This Mother’s Day weekend, we celebrate moms.  We celebrate the God nature in us.  We are physically designed and spiritually designed to nurture and guide.

Happy Mother’s Day.

Yet, I’d like to take the banner and run further. Regardless of where we (women) fall on the feminine spectrum:  Princess to tomboy.  Small to big.  Young to old.  We are women, we are female (regardless of the world’s confusion).  Proverbs 31 gives examples of a woman (don’t groan).  When we begin reading it – we are exhausted.  When done with the last verse, we can be overwhelmed with all that is listed.  BUT.  It is not a job-description.  It is a – celebration.  (Stay with me, I’ll explain).

At first glance it is strongly assumed it is written by a man. Well, it is … kinda. Most jump straight to the popular verses, beginning at verse ten and neglect the opening (vv1-9).  It is a man telling what his mom taught him.  One Jewish tradition claims the mom is Bathsheba teaching this to her son, Solomon.  She tells her son not to spend himself on women (plural). Do not waste yourself on wine.  And to be bold speaking up for the poor and helpless, – THIS is what a king does.  The following twenty-two verses are acrostic (the first letter of each sentence is in alphabetical order, in the Hebrew).

Mom goes on say, but this “woman” (singular) she is worth far more than valuable jewels. If the son is Solomon, it is said in 1 Kings 10, that he was the riches king, riches man on earth, and well, that wealth doesn’t stack up to a woman who “fears the Lord” (Prov 31:30).  A woman who is faithful, kind, prepared, charitable, hardworking, smart and confident.  She is a good wife and mother.

Verse 10, (paraphrasing) “Who can find such a woman of virtue.”  Many translations say, “wife” due to the context that she has a husband.  In the Hebrew “eishet chayil” (woman of virtue).  Chayil paints a vibrant picture. It can mean brave, excellent and noble.  It conveys a military tone as well, “one of war” – a warrior.  She is a woman of valor.  She is strong.

Of the 235 times “chayil” is used in scripture, all refer to either God or men.  All except – two.  Here, where Mom tells the son, a good God-fearing woman, a kind, STRONG woman is worthy of your interest, your strength.  The other?  Ruth.

In Ruth chapter three, just before Boaz is about to begin the process of taking her as his wife, he says the people of his village know her to be “eishet chayil” – “You, Ruth, are a woman of strength.”  You are hardworking, brave, faithful and wise.  Ruth, unlike the Proverbs 31 gal, is not married (she was, he died).  She does not have any children. 

Ruth goes on to marry Boaz and together they have a son named Obed.  He had a son named Jesse – he had a son named David.  This eishet chayil (woman of strength) was King David’s great-grandmother.  David went on to have a son named Solomon.  (God is the most brilliant Orchestrator!) 

Oh, beloved women of God, what a great connecting story!  A Godly woman is both married AND single.  She has children, while others do not. All women are to be celebrated.  Do not allow others to define you or frame you.  Not to be compared with – be celebrated

Be blessed in your image bearing – to the glory of God.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

I had the honor of speaking this to the women of our church this weekend at our annual Mother Daughter Tea & Breakfast.  I encouraged them to go back and read all of Proverbs 31 (and the 4 chapters of Ruth).  May the Holy Spirit breathe over them their worth – far more than valuable jewels.

Please note: It is the Jewish young men, who are encouraged to memorize Proverbs 31, NOT the young gals.  It is also tradition: at the Shabbat meal the men sing the Eishet Chayil (traditional Proverbs 31 song) to the matriarch and the women of the family – they celebrate them – weekly.

Guarding the God in Me

The year was 1983.  A young woman of 20 in her second year of bible college, kneels, while the men of God lay their hands gently on her head in a church service. Through prayer, they speak words of promise, hope and declarations of spiritual potential in her life. With anointing, they install a teaching mantle* along with… a warning. “You will protect yourself…”

That 20-year-old is now 58, that was me 38 years ago, (Gasp!) A lot has transpired in these many, many years. There have been (will be) hours and hours of study – preparation is positioning for the potential.  There have also been stupid mistakes, which held hands with frequent lapses of judgment. There were attempts: some quiet, and some blatant, attempts to destroy me. Destroy what God wanted to do in and through me.  I see the ever-increasing need to – protect

What am I protecting?  I am guarding the God in me.  Guarding what He entrusted to me, and in me and what He will do through me. 

Guarding.

Danger, in the spiritual realm, does not generally stand up and yell, while waving its arms, “Over here. Yep, HERE! I saved you a seat!” It is subtle. Evil watches for an opportunity to ensnare with no written invitation. Peter knew this: “Stay alert! Watch out for your great enemy, the devil. He prowls around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour. Stand firm against him and be strong in your faith” (1 Peter 5:8-9). Paul too strongly urges, “Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes” (Ephesians 6:11).

In our guarding we are to be shrewd. Acute in our awareness and preparedness. “A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences” (Proverbs 22:3, NLT)Other translations say when danger or evil is seen, the prudent person “hides”.   In the original Hebrew, hide is repeated, emphasizing the action. Using the context, a prudent man sees the evil and “in hiding, he will hide.” Meaning it is active and progressive. You do, so you stay … doing.

Our hiding ourselves is not a game of “peek-a-boo”.  Immature, “nothing can hurt me” games. Thinking we are hiding by merely covering our eyes and peeking out through our fingers.  It is a case of running AWAY (run FAST).  A running from – to.  To God. Hiding in His presence. “He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High, shall abide in the shadow of the Almighty” (Psalm 91:1).   Protection. We do this by staying daily in His word. Staying in fellowship with strong believers and staying under good biblical teaching.  Precautions, positioning, boundaries and accountability. (You do, so you stay … doing).

Guarding.

Solomon also wrote, “Keep and guard your heart with all vigilance and above all that you guard, for out of it flow the springs of life” (Proverbs 4:23, AMP). One resource explains it: Guard the affections of your heart; the emotional attachments you make determine the course of your life. Those things and people I attach myself to – determine which way I go. (See Psalm 1:1). Which way do I want to go?  God’s way.  Oswald Chambers strongly adds: “Never become attached to anything that continues to hurt God. For you to be free of it, God must be allowed to hurt whatever it may be.”

Where do you need to become more vigilant?  Guarding the God in you!  Others are counting on it!

Guarding.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds” – Hebrews 10:24).

*In Bible days, a Mantle (as mentioned above) was an outer cloak used for additional covering and warmth, especially at night, like that of a blanket.  From the idea of something that “covers” in the natural, a mantle represents spiritual covering as well.  It usually refers to spiritual authority and anointing, we can see this in the story of Elijah & Elisha found in 2 Kings 2.  A spiritual mantle can be wrapped as a scriptural metaphor (symbol) in a calling, gift, ability, anointing, skill set, or level of authority that God has given a specific person.  God determines the mantle – we do not select it!  It is established, designed and imparted by God.  It is an anointing, to serve God in the capacity of our spiritual DNA, destiny and calling of God.  It always has a cost. It always demands great responsibility.

Beyond What We Seem to Be

Saul said to David, “You are not able to go against this Philistine to fight with him, for you are but a youth, and he has been a man of war from his youth.” (1 Samuel 17:33, emphasis mine)

I LOVE the story of David and Goliath.  Big nasty dude yelling stupid things about God and God’s people. (Um, best not to do that).  But one day a boy comes to camp.  Goliath continues yelling, “This day I defy the armies of Israel! Give me a man and let us fight each other” (v10). Goliath is not just asking for any opponent; he wants a man.  A grown, trained, mature – “give me a challenge” – man.  

There is but one response. David.  Scholars believe him to be about seventeen(ish) when he told King Saul “send me.” Saul’s response says, “you are but a boy, an adolescence.”  The situation is beyond you, beyond what you are.  

The rest of the story is amazing.  Saul tries to get David to wear his suit of armor. Nope.  “I cannot go in these…” (v39). There was no hesitation on David’s part.  There was no “give me a minute while I figure this out.”  He takes his sling, stick and smooth stones and RUNS toward Goliath.  I must add to paint the picture correctly; Goliath’s shield-bearer was out there too (v41). Not so tough now big guy! David swung his sling, the stone hit the target.  Down went the giant of a man.  Goliath called for a man, King Saul declares a mere boy.  A boy did what God called him to do, “…in the name of the LORD Almighty” (v45). 

What is God calling us to? 

May we too not hesitate when we are called beyond what we seem to be.  Perhaps too young, untrained, too small, or possibly too big, too old.  Do not let others measure us against what God can do through us!  They will always come up short. When someone tells us, “You are not able to…. You are only…” Let us not begin a wardrobe change – try to fit into someone else’s stuff (armor).  But take up what we know (sling & stones) and RUN toward what God calls us to, declaring as David did “…the battle is the LORD’s” (v47). I’m sure if you wish to yell, “For Narnia!” God will understand.   

Now go…

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

It is HIS WAY!

Paul stands before King Herod Agrippa explaining his encounter with the risen Lord Jesus:

O King, I saw on the way a light from heaven, brighter than the sun, shining all around me… And when we had all fallen to the ground, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew dialect, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting Me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.’ “And I said, ‘Who are You, Lord?’ And the Lord said, ‘I am Jesus whom you are persecuting” (Acts 26:13-15, emphasis mine).

Jesus calls Paul (his Roman name) by his Hebrew name “Saul” and tells him “It is hard for you to kick against the goads.”   What is THAT? 

The bible is full of idioms (a common expression known to a specific culture or era). “Kicking against the goads” was a Greek proverb painting a picture the ancient culture easily understood.  A goad was much like our current day cattle prod (minus the electric current).  Farmers would use a pointed stick with a piece of iron on its tip to urge or prod a stubborn ox forward or along the guided path. Often the ox (in resistance) would kick against it. When doing so, the ox caused more pain for themselves. The Greeks used this saying to imply “ruinous resistance.” Paints a picture, doesn’t it?  It narrows down to this: unyielding rebellion is the refusal to accept or comply resulting in self destructive habits. 

Kicking against the goads.

Paul was a contemporary of Jesus’ time.  Scholars believe they both may have been in Jerusalem at the same time, resulting in Paul hearing or seeing Jesus speak.   Paul stood by as Stephen gave glorious testimony of Jesus.  Paul had ample opportunities regarding Jesus.  But he refused. Jesus rebukes Paul, telling him that he was only hurting himself in resisting the truth. Resisting Him.  He had to learn the hard way – resisting Jesus is a losing battle. Not to mention (but I will) a losing battle that WILL (like Paul) knock you on your butt. 

When reading the bible, we remember that there are specific words or warnings to specific people, yet in principle, it is for us as well.  Jesus says this to Paul but packs a punch likewise for us.  Are we actively in stubborn resistance?  How often do we sabotage our own spiritual growth by opposing God?   Like it or not. Resist it or not.  God is sovereign.  It is HIS WAY! Solomon wrote, “Stern discipline awaits him who leaves the path” (Prov 15:10a). Stay on the path! 

Kicking against the goads may come in many forms.  Jonah is a great example.  God pointed in one direction – he went in another.  His “goad” got him a dark smelly fish belly.  What does your goad look like?  Is yours a smelly mess?  Or sharp jabs?  Point to ponder.

Listen to the pains of consequences – by resisting God’s authority we are only punishing ourselves, “ruinous resistance.”

Kicking against the goads.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Post-Easter – Now What?

Earless chocolate bunnies and leftover deviled eggs in the frig. Post-Easter. Now what?   Do we rummage through the calendar for another holiday or an event to look forward to? What excites us about the future or even … daily?   May I be so bold in asking, what causes our inside to burn with excitement? What consumes our mind and emotions? What drives our behavior?

Post-Easter.

Jesus’ resurrection is AMAZING!  WONDERFUL!  DIVINE! REDEEMING! However, let’s not stop there. There is MORE!  Let’s unpack this in brief summary.  Stay with me, this is good! Luke 24, it speaks of the women going to the tomb, once there they find two angels who notify them that Jesus was no longer there. He’s risen from the dead! The gals go back to tell the others. Peter, as energetic as he was, runs to go see and confirms. Just following that, (v13) it says “Now that same day…” It proceeds to unfold the story of the two walking to Emmaus, who unknown to them at first, encounter Jesus. They are flabbergasted that this Stranger didn’t seem to know what had just transpired in Jerusalem.  Sharing their disappointment, “We had hoped that He was the one who was going to redeem Israel.” Going on they explained how Jesus’ body was not found. Verse 27, “Then He (Jesus) started at the beginning, with the Books of Moses, and went on through all the Prophets, pointing out everything in the Scriptures that referred to Him.”   WOW!  I’d love a one-on-one instant Bible study from the lips of the Master!

It wasn’t until Jesus was in their home, seated at their table, and they accepted the bread He offered, that their eyes were opened, and they had a revelation of Who He was. Could it be, that as Jesus reached forward, giving the bread, the sleeve of His garment slid up and they could see His nail scarred hand? At that exact moment, Jesus disappeared. I LOVE their response, “They said to each other, “Didn’t our hearts burn within us as He talked with us on the road and explained the Scriptures to us?”  (v32)

Their hearts burning within them. I want spiritual heartburn! I want my soul, my mind, and thoughts, passions, desires, and appetites to burn with Him and His Word! The word Luke chooses to use for “burning” is very colorful. It doesn’t mean to simply strike a match and light the kindling and watch it slowly give off heat. No, it RAVISHES through the wood and consumes it!  Burn Lord!

Notice Jesus didn’t lay hands on them or put mud on their eyes for the revelation. He didn’t drift from the shore in boat to speak to them. He didn’t even send them to the Priest for verification! He simply – walked with them. Walking and talking.  The narrative says they got up at once and went back to Jerusalem testifying that Jesus has indeed RISEN.

For us? The next time we find our seat at church or open the Bible for devotion time, let’s not daydream off to another place. Let’s do some focused walking, and talking.  Jesus told us, “The Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, will teach you all things…” (John 14:26). We just need to show up for the lesson. Pay attention, take notes, and ask questions, engage in conversation. THIS is the event. The daily event we will look forward to.

And …burn Lord, BURN within us! 

Post-Easter.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

THE Red-Letter Day


Have you ever sat and read in the New Testament ONLY the words in red, Jesus’ words? For a completely new perspective, I challenge us to do just that. I know context is everything, but let’s step out of the exegesis (interpreting the scriptures) box for a brief moment, to get an amazing snapshot of Jesus. His love, His compassion. His strength, and His authority.

Without all the narrative, those stand-alone red words pack a powerful punch, knowing they are Jesus. There are dramatic statements, strong commands, tender words and authority unlike any before Him. “Let it be so…” (Matt 3:15) “It is written…” (Matt 4:4) “Get up…” (Matt 9:6) “Take courage it is I…” (Matt 14:27) “Quiet, be still...” (Mk 4:39) “Come forth …” (Jn 11:43) “Don’t be afraid just believe...” (Mk 5:36) “What do you want Me to do for you…” (Mk 10:51) “Who do you say I am…” (Lk 9:20) “Then neither do I condemn you…” (Jn 8:11) “I am…” (Jn 18:6).

These are just a few.  But there is one more that stands out among the rest. Here I do want to set the context. Jesus is agonizingly set between two thieves. His feet and hands are nailed to a wooden cross. There at the foot of the cross, many mocked, some cried, and I am confident there were those in complete silence. After the vinegar water was given to Jesus, He said, “It is finished...” (John 19:30). He then bowed His head and gave up His spirit.

“It is finished.”  (Hang with me, this is GOOD God stuff!)  The word in Greek is amazing! Stand back and take in the whole Technicolor filled screen. I don’t think even Steven Spielberg with all his creative genius could convey the scene that was unfolding upon humanity. “It is finished” (Tetelestai). “To bring to an end, to fulfill. What is done corresponds to what has been said, ordered or commanded.”  (“Not My will, but Your will be done” – Jesus, Lk 22:42). It is accomplishing something not merely to end it but bring it to perfection for its designed goal.  Bring it to perfection for its designed goal!  Jesus. It signifies the successful end to a particular course of action.

Grammatically in the Greek, it is a crucial word; it is in the “perfect tense.”  Meaning, the action was completed in the past with results continuing in the present. Basically, “This happened, and it is still in effect TODAY.”  One might say, (so I will) “The gift that keeps on giving.”  This is different from “past tense” which points to an event, declaring “This happened – nothing more – the end.”  Head hung, shoulders slumped, nothing to see here, we’re going home.

NOT our Jesus – He is our NOW God!

It is finished!  Then, now and forever.

As Jesus said this, His blood flowing down His forehead, from His hands and His feet. His sacrifice, His action, now eliminating the debt owed (by you and me). May we take careful notice, Jesus didn’t say, “I am finished.”  That would imply He was a mere man and die defeated. Instead, He declared “It is finished.”  When He died and with His resurrection power, He left no unfinished business behind. He successfully completed the work He came to do.  Please note (this is HUGE) when Jesus rose from the dead and the stone was found “rolled away” it was NOT so He (the Son of God, Who walked on water. Who spoke to the wind and waves and they obeyed) could get out. It was so mankind could get in!  Get in and see “He isn’t here! He is risen from the dead, just as He said would happen. Come, see where His body was lying” (Matthew 28:6, NLT).

God doesn’t waste a detail. Jesus’ redemptive work: His hands nailed, redeeming Adam and Eve reaching and taking what was forbidden. His pierced slide, Eve was taken from man’s side, she, the first to respond to deception. His feet nailed, (the devil thought he had Jesus with this one). God’s curse to the serpent – hostility between serpent and Eve’s offspring “He will strike your head…” (Gen 3:15) WELL. Jesus did the striking indeed! (regardless of His confined feet).

As the pages turn from Genesis to this very moment, the culmination hits THIS important time and place. Jesus rises from the dead triumphantly (Happy Easter) the bridge back to the Father is perfected – He engages and commissions the disciples, returns to heaven to reign forever.

Does it end here?  No. Now we the church, with the authority given by Jesus Himself, as inspired by Holy Spirit carry on with the red-letter dramatic statements, strong commands, and tender words.

Move over Easter Bunny, here comes the risen King! Let’s all stand to our feet!  Raising our Hallelujah – “It is finished!”  Relationship offered; relationship restored.

May we live each day as a red-letter day! 

Blessed Easter.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Palm Sunday

This weekend we celebrate Palm Sunday. May we pause and look at the scriptural events.

Six days before the Passover…” Mary took a pint of perfume and poured it on Jesus’ feet, the house filled with the fragrance.   This was one day prior to Jesus’ triumphal entry (Palm Sunday) found in John 12.  The narrative describes the triumphal entry, “The next day…” It is safe to say, Jesus still smelled quite fragrant from the oil.  This being of Jewish telling, in Jewish culture, whilst Jewish people stood on the street as Jesus passed by, they (potentially) smelling the fragrance, resonated the Kingly procession, as they shouted: “Hosanna!  Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!  Blessed is the King of Israel” (v13).

Anointing was a priestly and kingly custom: Moses pouring oil on Aaron’s head (Leviticus 8:12) and Samuel over Saul (1 Samuel 10:1) and the anointing of David (1 Samuel 16:13).  Interestingly, Mary anoints Jesus’ feet.  Could it be, (just an observation) yes, the custom was washing the visitor’s feet from the dusty paths but could the anointing of His feet, (not His head) display the declared Majesty of God on earth, His Kingly walk among man, “The Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us.  We have seen His glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14).

Hosanna. What an amazing prophetic word. Turning to Mark chapter 11, his telling vividly explains the events of the day.  Jesus and the disciples are preparing to come into Jerusalem.  Jesus sends two of them ahead to get a young donkey, “Go into that village over there.” He told them. “As soon as you enter it, you will see a young donkey tied there that no one has ever ridden. Untie it and bring it here” (v2). Further in the narrative, “When they brought the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks over it, He sat on it” (v7). Jesus steps up and sits down. I believe the colt knew. Knowing the King of Majesty now drapes his back.

As Jesus rides through the cobblestone streets, the crowd begins to yell “Hosanna… Hosanna in the Highest” waving palm branches with enthusiasm.  It was common practice in the ancient world to welcome home a king or war hero by laying down branches in front of them (liken to our ticker tape celebrations today).

Hosanna is the Greek version of the Hebrew saying “yasha na” (yaw-shaw naw) meaning “Save now we pray.” This taken from what is known as the Hallel, (Jewish prayerful readings of Psalms 113-118). Specifically here, “O LORD, save us; (HOSANNA!) O LORD grant us success. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD. From the house of the LORD we bless you.” (Psalm 118:25, 26, emphasis mine).  Can we grasp the impact of what they are saying? Jesus was fulfilling the prophetic words of Zechariah, “Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Zion! Shout, Daughter of Jerusalem! See, your king comes to you, righteous and having salvation, gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey” (9:9).

However. Just four chapters later, the crowd was again yelling, but this time; “Crucify Him! Crucify Him!” (Mark 15:12-14). Little did they know they were basically yelling the same thing. Both times! For you see beloved, for Jesus to “save we pray” they had to “Crucify Him!” He allowed it. Apply John the Baptists words of splendor here: “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29). He laid down His life for YOU and for me. By this act and His rising from the dead with all Kingly authority and power – He stood in the gap – reaching for your hand and placing it into the hand of the Father.  He is the Restorer of relationship.  Restoring God and mankind.

This weekend, may we not allow this moment to pass us by, as we whole-heartedly consider the impact and fulfillment of HosannaJESUS!  Jesus riding an untamed colt in a King’s procession.

“SAVE WE PRAY!”  

THAT He did!

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

The Heart

The Psalmist wrote, “I have hidden Your word in my heart that I might not sin against You” (Psalm 119:11). Many scholars believe King David wrote Psalm 119, being that Psalm 19 is attributed to him and holds much of the same language. They speak of the law, statues, precepts, commands and decrees of God.  David’s desire to place God’s word in his heart conveys setting with intent to cover as to protect.  Much like when God placed Moses in the cleft of the rock and covered him with His hand (Exodus 33:22).  This hiding is to conceal something of great value.

While we are hiding God’s valuable word in our heart, we must be careful – so incredibly careful of what is hidden in alongside His word.  David leans into this, “Teach me Your way, O LORD and I will walk in Your truth; give me an undivided heart, that I may fear Your name” (Psalm 86:11).  God told the Israelites they were to have “no other gods before Me” (Exodus 20:3).

Decluttering the heart – removing the “alongside, other” stuff.

David’s son, the wise man Solomon also wrote, “Guard your heart above all else, for it determines the course of your life” (Proverbs 4:23, NLT). In the Hebrew, the guarding is in the “present imperative” tense. Meaning, it is a command calling for us to make this our habitual practice. We don’t just do it once, or now and then when seemingly needed. Seemingly is the key.  How many times in hindsight we KNOW we missed an opportunity to do us some guarding?  We are to do it always we guard.  Some translations state “keep your heart.” The heart is to be kept above all keeping.

The biblical heart is representative of our inner man. Where we think, feel and process our choices.  God’s wisdom, His words of command. His insight to moral skill are not to be clouded – they are to be single. They are worth guarding – above all.  For it is HERE (place the “X” here). Here is where the heart flows all the thoughts and words and choices of our life. Guard.

May we be like King David hiding God’s word in our heart – but may we be just as vigilant in guarding against what also may be hiding there.

The hiding, decluttering and guarding of the heart.

Point to ponder.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)