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Give Him Just One

Women.  We are used to multi-tasking.  Having our minds and lives firing in five or more directions all at the same time. When we find ourselves on overload, what do we tend to do, and do well?  I’ll go ahead and answer – we criticize ourselves. 

I am reminded of a time when I sat amongst a small group of gals in a bible study setting years ago. In that discussion time, we were sharing our goals for the study. There was a mother of 4 (FOUR!) small, YOUNG, needing her attention, children.   In her frustration and complete weariness, she shared in depth about not having enough time for devotions and her bible study. She was exhausted.  She felt defeated. She was basically giving up, to where she hadn’t opened her Bible in some time.  Those in the group kept trying to help with creative ways to carve out enough time. “Go to bed earlier, get up earlier, use paper plates, when they sleep ….” This young mom was nearly in tears. I just sat and listened. These are all good disciplined goals. Yet they were more worried about the quantity of time, rather than the quality.

I finally leaned forward and looked the young gal in the eyes. Lovingly and tenderly asked, “Could you look at just ONE verse each day or one verse for the whole week?” She stopped talking. So did the others.  Silence.  Reading their expressions, yet not verbalizing, “This gal is NUTS! One stinkin verse?  THAT is NOT enough! I will get behind! I have to get through that one-year reading plan, gotta get my homework done! Gotta write in my journal.”

This attitude belongs to many of us.  How many of us too, feel defeated and allow our God time to slip, slip away because we can’t keep up with the quota.

I then shared that it’s not the quantity of time with God and His word that is important, it is the quality. If you have just enough time to read one verse – then the baby cries, or the dog is having a fit at the front door or milk is split (so goes life).  Then take that ONE verse, WHILE you are cleaning up the milk – holding the crying baby.  Ask Holy Spirit to speak to you about that verse. You, God, His word.  Quality time. Listen – listen for HIS application, throughout the day, throughout the week.  If need be at the beginning of the week, jot down that verse on a 3×5 card, tape it to the mirror in the bathroom, even though you may have a parade of offspring following you in there, READ it aloud.  Again and again.

Don’t get me wrong I am ALL OVER Bible study, BUT there are seasons, seasons when time captures us. Seasons even with discipline, our life, our arms are full.  The Pastor of Hebrews wrote; “For the word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.” (Hebrews 4:12) Allow the alive word to minister to you! Remember, God spoke the universe into place with His word, He can decorate your heart with the same. One verse?  Enough? Yes.  Yes, it is with the Holy Spirit “leading you into all truth.” (Jn 16:13)

During that moment of silence with the gals, I shared I often carry a tattered memory verse in my pocket. I once spent days just on Thomas’ “… my Lord and my God” (Jn. 20:28). Knowing the context, I thought about it. I said it. I pictured it and I prayed it.  Just five words. It was amazing.  The gals just sat there and stared at me. (I was shocked that they allowed me to sit at their table the following week).

God knows us, knows our heart. He knows YOU.  For some of us whose season doesn’t allow for hours or minutes of quiet time alone – don’t stress!  Don’t feel condemned. If we can give Him just ONE verse, HIS word, He can and will minister to us. It can be amazing.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Breathe

I am reminded of a time a few years ago, when walking into church a bit tattered from the week that led to that day. I took my seat (5 rows back, first seat in). Placing my bible next to me, the first thing that captured my attention was the quiet melody playing over the sound system. It was familiar and soothing, “As the deer panteth…” It was then, I felt the Lord impress on me, “Just breathe!” As the worship began, we all stood. I closed my eyes and did just that: Took a deep breath. Overwhelmed with His presence, I was reminded of – the breath of God.

How often do we find ourselves in survival mode? Barely making it. You feel your existence evaporating with each step forward. As the day goes on you find yourself unsuccessfully reaching and grabbing for anything solid. Thinking, “If I can just make it through this day. Through this season.  To the next paycheck.  See that person. BE that person.  Get this done, that done.  Clean this.  Lose this, gain that.” BREATHE.

Just breathe.

In pondering this, (it may sound totally silly) I began looking at our breath and the ramifications of the lack of oxygen that takes place physically. How it affects us and how long it takes for a body to die. Not to be morbid or anything, but I feel it has quite a few similarities to our spiritual man.

In all the medical jargon, I found this quote: “A lack of oxygen to the heart muscle can cause heart attacks, and even if the individual survives the anoxic event (complete depletion of oxygen), there may be damage to the heart that proves deadly.” This doesn’t even speak of the damage to the brain. There are also “quiet” symptoms that are attributed to a lack of oxygen as well: Depression, irritability, and irrational behavior. Anyone? 

Just breathe!

Like that of our physical body, so it is with our spiritual man. We NEED to breathe. Without a constant intake of God, the ramifications can prove damaging if not deadly. I believe we all have people in our lives that once were thriving-active, God-loving folks. But somehow, somewhere along their spiritual timeline – they stopped.  They stopped reading God’s word. Stopped fellowshipping with other believers. Stopped believing God and stopped breathing God.  Now, where are they?  (Or is it us?)

Genesis 2:7 “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life and man became a living soul.” Our bodies were made of the dust – earth – biological. The soul was not made of the earth. So… earthly things cannot quench the hunger of the soul, (regardless of how much kale we eat) nor can the soul continue to survive. It is only the breath of God that feeds and nurtures the spiritual man! Read that again. “It is ONLY the breath of God that feeds and nurtures the spiritual man!” It is divinely birthed and divinely maintained.

How often do we seek things, people, position, and even events to satisfy our deep longing, and cravings? Without God’s breath and presence in our life, we are an empty dusty vessel. God initiated this for mankind, now we by invitation in turn seek that breath. 

Just breathe.

Paul spoke to this in 2 Timothy, “Every part of Scripture is God-breathed and useful one way or another—showing us truth, exposing our rebellion, correcting our mistakes, training us to live God’s way. Through the Word we are put together and shaped up for the tasks God has for us.” (3:15-17 – paraphrased, The Message). And the one who penned Hebrews wrote, “For the word of God is alive and powerful. It is sharper than the sharpest two-edged sword, cutting between soul and spirit, between joint and marrow. It exposes our innermost thoughts and desires. Nothing in all creation is hidden from God.” (4:12, NLT)

Just breathe.

Have we found we can’t seem to catch our spiritual breath? Are we low in emotion, irritable and even find our self being irrational or treating others unkindly?  Are we apathetic about spiritual things?  Or how about walking to the “frig of life” looking for something to satisfy us.  If we are to survive, let alone THRIVE spiritually, we need God’s presence and His word to do so. When was the last time we quietly spent time with our God? Prayed, invited His presence? When was the last time we pursued Him, His qualities? When was the last time opened His word and really, truly saw beyond the printed pages, and breathed Him in?

Just breathe.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Crossing the Line

It has been said throughout history, “Now you have really crossed the line.”  Many, if not most often, was said to those who made stupid (STUPID) decisions. The line.  You know, the place where good and bad stand facing each other.  Ever find yourself there?  Standing either on the line, straddling it or now – just inches beyond.   

Crossing the line.

Aaron of the Old Testament was a line crosser.  Exodus 32.  Setting the context: Moses was up on the Mount with God; God was etching the Law on the Tablets (and giving the blueprint for the Tabernacle AND giving the instruction for the priesthood – for Aaron).  While this was happening – chaos below.  The people grew restless.  Aaron was left in charge.  Leadership was not new to him, being Moses’ brother, he was at his side confronting Pharaoh in Egypt. He was there when manna and quail was provided to the people, and when the rock gushed water.  He, along with Hur, held up Moses’ arms in the battle against the Amalekites.  Now.  Now the folks come to AARON frustrated and lost, saying, “Do something… make us gods to follow…” 

The line. 

Aaron responds by instructing them to take off all their jewelry, handing it to him, the narrative says he used a tool and he (Aaron) shaped the image into a calf. (Heavy sigh on the part of the readers). Placing the idol in front of an altar and the people – chaos. He truly crossed the line.

God sent Moses back down to the people. Out of disgust, Moses carrying the Tablets, threw them, breaking them to pieces.  Moses confronts all.  Aaron still across “the line” states, “Do not be angry, you know how prone these people are to evil. They said to me, ‘Make us gods who will go before us. Then they gave me the gold, and I threw it into the fire, and out came this calf” (vv22-24).  Hm … interesting.  He actually went with the “Oh, looky there, a calf.” (*See note below of Moses interceding for the people and Aaron).

The line. 

As the people ran wild, Moses stood at the entrance to the camp, declaring “Those who are for the LORD, come…” (v26).  The line drawn.  A new line for Aaron. Immediately ALL the Levites rallied to Moses.  You see, here is where we pause – Aaron is a Levite.  Aaron crossed the line AGAIN.  He crossed back. The folks were instructed to grab a sword and about three thousand died that day. (There are consequences to running wild in and with the chaos).

What AMAZES me, Aaron crossed the line and made that HUGE bad, very icky bad decision. Yet. God. Forgiveness runs deep, so very deep.  God chose him to be a priest.  Going on to stand before the people, representing the holiness of God (See Lev 9; Nu 6:22-27).

How many of us have been where Aaron was, made some really STUPID decisions, crossed the wrong line, found our lives in chaos and not to mention (but I will) chaos too for those around us.  God in His most gracious love offers “cross the line again” opportunities. Cross back to where we belong.  His forgiveness running deep.  Just like Aaron, the opportunity was there, he immediately stepped forward. God used him mightily.  Perhaps you stand now rubbing your toe against the first line, wondering – just wondering, what’s on the other side?

Stop.

Life is not meant to be a hopscotch game, stepping and hopping from one line to the other, yet when the line is crossed – CROSS BACK!

I love Kings David’s Psalm 133.  “How good and pleasant it is when brothers live together in unity! It is like precious oil poured on the head, running down on the beard, running down on Aaron’s beard, down upon the collar of his robes. It is as if the dew of Hermon were falling on Mount Zion. For there the LORD bestows his blessing, even life forevermore.”

A restored line.

Beautiful.

Have you crossed the line? God offers the most easy and soul fixing opportunity: John writing to Christians, “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 Jn 1:9).  When we mess up, we come to God and get cleaned up (crossing back). Biblical confession literally means: to concede, come into agreement. In this case, agreement with God.  Confessing is not only saying we are wrong, but we are also saying God is RIGHT.  Crossing back, is coming into alignment with the rightness of God.  (Let’s stay there).

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrew 10:24)

*See Deut 9:7-21 – a recap of the Exodus 32 calf scenario – God was very angry, “I have seen this people and they are a stiff-necked people indeed!  Let me alone, so that I may destroy them… and the LORD was angry enough with Aaron to destroy him.” (vv13,14 & 20) – Moses interceded. May we be a Moses to those we love, who have crossed the line – intercede.

Is THAT in the Bible?

Once when perusing through Facebook, I came across a picture that looked to be taken from the pages of the Bible. The one who posted it thought it pretty, eloquent and held promise: “Behold, this is a choice land, and whatsoever nation shall possess it shall be free from bondage, and from captivity and from all other nations under heaven, if they will but serve the God of the land who is Jesus Christ…” (v12) “YES, let’s claim it!” WAIT!  Not being a scholar by any means, but I don’t remember reading this.  At first glance it sounds a bit Old Testament(ish) doesn’t it?  After a lil research I found the verse to be from the book of Ether (2:12) and yes, I spelled that right Ether – it is from the book of Mormon. It’s the story of the Jaredites who were led by God to the Americas shortly after the Tower of Babel scenario (um…). It may be pretty – but not biblical.

How often do we refer to, strongly consider, or even quote what is NOT in the bible?  Example, “Pride goes before a fall…” although close, prides ultimate end isn’t a scraped knee – but destruction, “Pride goes before destruction and a haughty spirit before a fall” (Proverbs 16:18). How often do we hear; “Well the Bible says, ‘Money is the root of all evil!’”  Head hung, shoulders slumped; condemnation felt.  NO, it’s the “LOVE of money that is the root of all sorts of evil.” (1 Timothy 6:10, emphasis mine).

Another, “The lion shall lay down with the lamb.” There is no mention of this in scripture. Many would say, oh sure it is – in Revelation. Nope.  However, in Isaiah 11:6 (see also 65:25) it speaks of the wolf and the lamb will dwell and graze together, but no lamb sweetly nestled against the side of a powerful lion. And those with the rolling of the eyes while saying, “Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.”  As they continue urging, “It’s in Proverbs.”  Again, nope. It comes from a line from William Congreve’s play, “The Mourning Bride.” The proverb they may have been referring to “It is better to live in a corner of the roof than in a house shared with a contentious woman.” (Pro 25:24)

The next time something questionable is seen or quoted to us, or perhaps sounds “good” or conveyed as trivial – seek it out YOURSELF.  Charles Spurgeon said, “Discernment is not knowing the difference between right and wrong. It is knowing the difference between right and almost right.”  It’s that “almost right” that causes us heartache. Trusting first in trivial things, leads to blind deception (See 2 Timothy 4:3-4). May we not be easily swept away by pretty, eloquent or what sounds promising.   Go for the truth. Jesus said when praying to the Father, “Sanctify them in the truth; Your word is truth.” (John 17:17) And Paul wrote under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.” (2 Timothy 3:16-17)

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Patience

“Patience is a virtue” they say. I’m not quite sure who they are, but as I join the applause and celebrate this God-quality, I am also very aware however, the closest we often get is “Hurry up and WAIT!” while possibly running a few folks over in the process.

In the New Testament there are two main kinds of patience mentioned, with a third quality attached. Paul states he had been praying that those in Colossae live a life worthy of God and please Him in every way “…bearing fruit in every good work, growing in the knowledge of God, being strengthened with all power according to His glorious might so that you may have great endurance and patience, and joyfully giving thanks to the Father” Col. 1:10-12 (NIV, emphasis mine).

Endurance, (hupomone in the Greek) is patience in circumstances. The quality of steadfastness. Some would say – staying power.  This staying power is motivated by HOPE. It is the characteristic of a man (or woman) who is not swerved from their deliberate purpose, sustaining through to the end – regardless. Keep, keeping on. 

Among the Fruit of the Spirit, there is love, joy, peace… patience. The word Paul uses here, is not hupomone (though defiantly a quality of the Spirit). BUT Paul uses makrothumia which is unlike hupomone, patience in circumstances, inspired by hope. Makrothumia is patience with PEOPLE, inspired by MERCY. Relational.

Jesus teaches this through the parable in Matthew 18, (I paraphrase). The King has a servant who owed a large sum of money, when the debt was called, the servant fell on his knees before the King. “Be patient (Makrothumia) with me!” he begged. The King offered mercy, holding back punishment, releasing him. As soon as the servant went free, he found a friend that owed HIM money. He too called the debt. The friend begged the same, “Be patient with me…” But the servant refused mercy and put the friend in prison. The King heard of this, summoning the servant, stating, “I gave you mercy, shouldn’t you have given mercy as well.” What an amazing picture! The unmerciful servant. Patience is motivated by mercy. May we too “remember when…” When God has patience with us!

Paul continues this thread, “Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience (Makrothumia). Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.” (Col. 3:12-13, again I emphasize, see also Eph 4:1-3) The “bearing” with one another, literally means “to put up with” – but not just that, it is holding back – to hold in. STOP! Good Godly interaction with others is not only about what we DO just as much as what we don’t – RESTRAINT. (May I just offer – “OUCH!”)

God’s mercy is withholding what we do deserve, where His grace is giving us what we do not. One hand pushes forward in giving, the other holds back in restraint. What divine coordination. God patiently bearing with us.

I am challenged to pray for patience, sounds a bit risky (in all honesty). Do I really want to point out, wave in the direction of patience?  Yes (as I duck). Loving others can be messy, but perhaps kind patience could be the missing piece needed.  While I am reminded of the patience and mercy and the most amazing grace God has for me.

Patience. 

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on towards love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

What is the Yoke?

Paul wrote, “For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery.”  (Gal. 5:1, ESV)

What is the biblical yoke?

The yoke figuratively represents the burdensome nature of slavery.  It is a symbol of servitude (either by choice or forced). It suggests restrictiveness, yet this is but one aspect of the yoke.  A yoke for the most part is an idiom (something known to a specific culture or era). Of the sixty-one times “yoke” is used in the Bible, all are metaphorical (apart from seven uses).

Stick with me, this gets good.

In the first century the yoke had taken on a unique meaning, a cultural meaning. The Jewish culture was a discipleship culture, a “we” culture (vs our “me” culture).  Our western mindset focuses on “What does the scriptures teach me about me?  Who am I?  What do I do?  The eastern mindset, “What does the scriptures teach me about the nature and character of God?”   Disciples would attach themselves to a Rabbi, following close, listening and learning. The Rabbi would teach the disciple their interpretation and application of the scriptures.  The phrase “sitting at the feet of a Rabbi” was cultural. Remember Paul said he was educated “at the feet of Gamaliel” (Acts 22:3). When Jesus taught in Matt 5-7, what does the narrative say, “after He sat down… He opened His mouth and began to teach them.” (5:1) And in Luke 10, Mary is found at the feet of Jesus “listening to His word” (v39).  Jesus allowing and championing for it (seen in the “Martha, Martha” conversation) was a radical move on His part – accepting a woman disciple so boldly.

Most Rabbis were “Torah Teachers.”  These Rabbis spent most of their time in the synagogues, reading and teaching the written Law of God and taught only accepted interpretations (passed to them by their Rabbi).  These teachings were called the “yoke of Torah” or the Rabbi’s Yoke. 

In Jesus’ day, Jesus’ world, every Rabbi (and Pharisee) had one.  It was their collection of teachings. It was their theology and perspective on the scriptures: Who God is and what it means to walk with Him. Their disciples would accept it and emulate it, taking on the “yoke” (teaching) of their Rabbi. 

Over the many years, many of the Rabbi’s (primarily Pharisees) inflated and added commands, making following them rather rough.  To fulfill every command (interpretation) was difficult.  Each Rabbi having their own emphasis.

Consider now, Jesus’ words in Matt 11 “”Come to Me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and my burden is light.” (vv28-30).  In essence, consider my summary “Let ME be the one to show you who the Living God is – what He is like – what it means to follow Him!”  Think now, how many times Jesus continued to point to the Father  (i.e.) “I tell you the truth, the Son can do nothing by himself; he can do only what he sees his Father doing, because whatever the Father does the Son also does.” (Jn 5:19) And Jesus speaks only how and what “to say” from the Father (Jn 12:49). He speaks with authority from the Father.

Now THAT is a YOKE!

There was a smaller group of Rabbi’s – known to have s’mikhah – (pronounced Smee-KAWK … Hebrew throat slur). “Walking in the authority of God.”  These Rabbis with s’mikhah (authority) could make NEW interpretation, application AND pass legal judgments.  Many scholars believe Jesus had taken on the authoritative Rabbinical role.

Matthew makes note, “When Jesus had finished saying these things, the crowds were amazed at his teaching, because he taught as one who had authority, and not as their teachers of the law.” (The Torah Teachers in the synagogue).  (Matt 7:28-29).  Many times, the narrative speaks of people’s amazement at His authority.

Remember multiple times Jesus said, “You have heard it said – But I say to you…”  Especially in the Sermon on the Mount. Jesus gave clear instruction, often quoting the Law, yet reaching beyond the interpretative mandates.  Some teachers of the Law would step as close to the “line” of law, assuming to not break it – “You can look and lust, but don’t touch.”  Jesus said, “It all begins in the heart”  (summary).

Those hearing His words had never heard the scriptures explained like He did, with NEW insights, application – with authority.  Jesus spoke of covenant – the NEW covenant – passing legal judgments. Authority indeed.

Jesus commissioned His disciples: “All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.  “Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit,  teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.”  (Matt 28:18-20, NASB, emphasis mine).

Swinging back to the beginning, regarding Paul’s words in Galatians 5:1 – Paul originally taught those in the region of Galatia the gospel is of grace through faith and not of works – Christ had set them free from Jewish ceremonial laws and regulations, those regulations heaped on its followers.  Metaphorically, he had reached over and took the heavy burdened yoke off – yet they again had reached for the “yoke of slavery.”    (See also Acts 15:10 “Now, therefore, why are you putting God to the test by placing a yoke on the neck of the disciples that neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear?” ESV)  

Fascinating note: When researching the actual yoke and the training of an ox for more understanding, I found that fitting the ox with the yoke: It is BEST that the ox raises its head up into the yoke for the most comfortable and profitable fit. This comes with time and trust, that the animal is willing to voluntarily lift their head to the master. If forced down, the fit could cause irritation, causing the ox to lean, favoring one side, and possibly altering the direction of their steps.  A “harnessed heart” is a true lifting of the head to the Master. 

May we too be mindful of the yoke we raise up into – be it the yoke of Jesus.  Being His disciple; following close, listening, learning, and taking on and emulating His teaching.

The yoke.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Resources: “Rabbi and Talmidim” (except from “In the Dust of the Rabbi”) by Ray Vander Laan. “The Yoke” By Archdeacon Allan Paulsen. “The Yoke” The Messianic Prophecy Bible Project (Free.messianicbible.com).  Prof Kristi McMelland, Professor of Biblical Culture, “Jesus & Women: In the First Century & Now“.  The ESV Commentary. Barnes Notes on the NT: Galatians.  Bible Background Commentary (Acts 15:10). And any other geeky place I forgot to jot down.

Revelation vs Resolution

Happy New Year!  As the calendar rolls to a new year, we flip through the photos, whether it be of puppies, sunset images or as I just hung mine, a simple calendar with a pretty marble border. The empty squares indicating days yet to be lived. Those twelve pages can either propel us or paralyze us.

The change of the New Year has traditionally become a re-setting if you will of our life compass. We evaluate the past and plan for the future. For some of us, this means sitting down and writing out our Resolutions. Money to be made, exercise routines, diet plans, buy that new house, get that promotion, clean out those closets, get organized – the list goes on. Don’t get me wrong, these are all a good plan of attack.  Yet there is more.  A New Year’s Resolution can be defined as “a firm decision to do or not do something, a course of action designed with the intent to keep a vow.” Statistics claim, one in three Americans makes a New Year’s resolution of some sort, yet only about 75% of these folks stick to their goal for at least … a week.

Have we considered that instead of a resolution to do better, get more, and perhaps try to be something other than we are, that we seek … revelation? As we stand at the door of 2021 (with a hardy “Good-bye” wave to 2020), may we take pause and truly position ourselves to seek a fresh revelation of our God.

Revelation. The act of disclosing or discovering what was before unknown. I would offer; we may have read it, even know it (the story) but let’s reach beyond. Let’s be intentional (is the focus of our church for 2021). As we read through our Bibles, invite Holy Spirit to read with us, pointing out incredible and wondrous things. Showing us unwavering and astounding qualities of His character.  Paul wrote, “Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think” (Romans 12:2a, NLT). That is my plan, this is my goal. I seek to be transformed. Not only doing/being what is in my finite human power to do – but HIS transforming. Making a firm decision to take action to learn and accept and walk in more of His love, trust His hand and bow more in gratitude of His mercy and grace.

Revelation.

I pray over us as Paul did, “I kneel before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth derives its name. I pray that out of His glorious riches He may strengthen you with power through His Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.” (Amen) – Ephesians 3:14-20 (NIV)

From our home to yours, a hardy blessed (full of revelation) Happy New Year.

In Him, DeDe & Mark (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

YOU Are the Reason for the Season

This holiday season I have been pondering and rolling around in my head, the little seasonal rhyme, “Jesus is the reason for the season.”  It fits well as a lapel pin, even hangs proudly as an ornament on our trees.  I like it!  The message is clear and points to Jesus!

Yet… I began to think of this in theological terms, the accuracy of it. I know… I KNOW you are rolling your eyes at this point. But bear with me. I am a people watcher. I watch how they walk, how they talk, their mannerisms, their facial expressions.  The other day as I was Christmas shopping, I watched their faces, looked into their eyes, wondering if THEY knew Jesus. Then it dawned on me – “THEY are the reason for the season!”

The season is Christmas. Christmas is JESUS, His birth. “For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whosoever believes in Him, should not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16) The best gift ever! Jesus came to earth, the divine embodied in human form. His life message pointing to Kingdom stuff. His death representing us. He resurrected in full power and authority and now sits, enthroned on the right hand of the Father – for US!  He came to fix the man-made mess. WE are the “whosoever.”  WE are the reason for the season! Bring it down – YOU are the reason for the season! (Ok, group cyber-HUG!) Yes, it’s all about Jesus – what He did for YOU!  He came for YOU!  THE best gift giving possible.  

Even with all the self-interest, self-emersion, self, self, self and all the “I” focus today, this Christmas look into the eyes of those around you, up and over your mask and consider THEM!  What a great opening line to the gospel, said with heartfelt humility as you tenderly lean forward “Did you know YOU are the reason for the season…” Then tell them about Jesus and why He came, use their name (read their name badge if they have one) “Bob, He came for YOU!”  Most know about the baby in the manger, now tell them about the baby-grown KING.

The Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us. We have seen His glory, the glory of the One and Only, Who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” – John 1:14

Blessed Christmas to you and yours,

In Him, DeDe & Mark (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on towards love & deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Myrrh, White Elephant it is Not

Christmas, a time of sharing, loving and gift giving.  We are in the season of hunting for those perfect gifts. Regardless of what makes it home with us from the mall, masked and ready to buy or what arrives from Amazon. All of us have gifts to offer. God-given gifts that He asks that we share with one another. Whether it is the gift of serving or the gift of encouragement, or the gift of a listening ear.  Or perhaps hospitality, providing an extra place at the dinner table. No gift is too small, or seemingly insignificant.

Gifts.

We often read the Christmas story and highlight the most spectacular parts: Singing angels. “Fear Not” statements. The Star of Bethlehem, and yes, the dingy manger. YET, there are some quiet and less compelling items to be had in the excitement.  Gifts.  Consider if you will, (imagine with me) the Magi (Matt 2) as they prepare for their trek out to find the child to whom the shiny Star belongs. (Tradition, not scripture, says there were three wise men, only because the three gifts that were given). They are packing, dividing the supplies list. Then they come to the gift inventory; gold is given to the first, then frankincense handed to another. “Oh yeah” the myrrh is last. How would you like to be handed the myrrh and picture yourself bowing low, head to the floor while you offer to the King of Kings, M-Y-R-R-H (said with an Eeyore deep tone). You may think “Why do I have to carry the white elephant gift?”   White elephant it is not. It is one among the triune gifts that are of great value. 

Have we thought about these gifts? Gold, we have that one down. Frankincense is ground dried up tree sap used as incense, highly fragrant when burned.  And myrrh, what is THAT?

The divine significance of myrrh: It also comes from the sap of a tree, yet it is not just some sticky goo creatively used.  It was:

  1. In the divinely prescribed anointing oil of the Tabernacle and the priests (Exodus 30:22-23). 
  2. In the perfumed oil poured over Jesus’ feet (John 12:3, Matthew 26:12: The ointment is “Myron” which is myrrh-oil). 
  3. Also, as one of the spices to prepare Jesus’ body for burial (John 19:39-40).

Picture now, the Christ child, perhaps two in age or younger. Jesus with curly dark hair, possibly pudgy cheeks. At His feet, the Magi place gold, frankincense, and MYRRH. The same anointing oil used to anoint temple priests, now set before Jesus – our High Priest (Hebrews 4:14-16).  The same perfumed myrrh now before small feet – would one day be oil poured over a grown mans feet, those feet that would one day hang on a cross and be pierced. Jesus was also offered wine mixed with myrrh, but He didn’t take it. (Mk 15:23; Matt 27:34) Scholars believe Jesus refused to drink the mixture, due to its numbing effect.  He wanted to be fully aware, fully present in the suffering for mankind. Myrrh was the oil added to the spices wrapped around His body following His death. 

Jesus, now a child, will one day, be the man fulfilling this gift. Myrrh, HOW PROPHETIC.

Christmas gift-giving, following the Magi’s example: Regardless of how insignificant it may seem at a quick glance among the noisier aspect of things – we never know the impact and how far-reaching our giving may be. Today it’s not so much the item, but the heart of giving. The giving of self is a gift. An encouraged heart, a feed soul, a person no longer lonely. Gifts given in Jesus’ name – the gift that keeps on giving.   

Note: For those of you who work Crossword Puzzles: 5 letters down: “Anointing oil of the Tabernacle, the priests and Jesus?”  The answer: “Myrrh” (YAY! You’re welcome).

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Mary Pondered

This is a bit long, but I encourage you to keep reading to the end.

There is a story of four young Jewish Yeshiva students, (Jewish seminary). One afternoon in a study session, one student gave a book to one of the men asking him to take a look and “Tell us what you think.”

Later that night, curious of the book, in eagerness, he sat down and opened to Genesis 1:1. He started to read, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” (Pause). “What?” he thought. He read it again “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” Excited, he stood up, exclaiming, “NO!” And continues, “God’s not finished!” And closed the book!

You see, in the ancient writings, originally there were no chapters – no verses and no punctuation. According to Hebrew thought (and method) they never paused until the complete thought was finished, they read to the edge of the story. The book handed to this young man was the English version of the bible, The King James.

The very first verse is just part of a story. That story is part of a bigger story – the historical story of God. We often read, pause, or stop before the whole of a particular story is in sight. Or we come to a famous or familiar portion of scripture, so familiar that with a “Oh I know this part” we run our finger down and turn the page.

I want to offer; in our familiarity we may be missing some very key elements to the story.

One example is 1 Samuel 17, David and Goliath. We all know the story, we’ve heard it, we’ve seen it played out on the flannelgraph board. Younger brother comes into camp. He hears the noise out front. He is told the battle line has been drawn. The Philistines’ biggest warrior awaits one of the Israelites to come fight him. David volunteers. The king offers his armor. Young David tries it on. Too awkward. Taking it off, he goes with what he knows best. Gathering stones, carrying his staff and sling. He and Goliath have words – he runs at the giant of a man. Swirling and releasing his sling, the stone struck Goliath in the forehead and down he went. YAY! Great story! Turn the page. But.

The story isn’t over. Keep reading. It says David ran over, taking Goliath’s sword and cut off his head. It was here, the narrative says the Philistines saw their champion was dead, they turned and ran (v51). From their perspective they may have only seen the lil guy throw something at Goliath but taking his head off – he was dead – bad dead. He was not getting up from THAT!

Another example of reading beyond the familiar. We fast forward to the NT – Mark chapter 4. Jesus and the disciples are on the shore of Galilee. Jesus tells the guys, “Let’s cross to the other side of the lake.” They load up and head out. At some point Jesus lays down and falls asleep. A huge storm hits the lake. The disciples wake Jesus up rather excitedly. Jesus rebukes the wind and says to the waves. “Peace! Be still!” The wind ceased and there was great calm. YAY! Great story! Turn the page. But. The story isn’t over. It reads that the guys were filled with great fear. The narrative says the disciples weren’t afraid of the storm – they were overwhelmed with great reverence and respect for – Jesus. Asking each other “WHO IS THIS?” The wind and waves obey Him (v41). They had underestimated Him. Jesus had their attention.

We read the story of Christmas. Found in both Matthew and Luke. We know this story as well – very well. Both Mary and Joseph are told great things, divine things through angelic visits. In short (but not belittled) – Mary, although never being with a man, would become pregnant, conceived of the Holy Spirit. This baby boy would “save the people from their sins.” (Matt 1:21) At one point, Joseph, and Mary head to Bethlehem for the national census. There are some housing issues. Once settled, the baby, who is to be called Jesus, is born.

Luke chapter 2 tells of the shepherds living in the fields taking care of the sheep. They too get angelic declarations. An angel appears declaring good news, for “Today in the town of David a Savior is born to you; He is Christ the Lord.” (2:11) The shepherds are told what to look for, the wrapped baby laying in a manger. Then the backup singers appear, angels singing God’s praises, “Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace…” (v14) When the angels exit, so do the shepherds, excited, they go and find Mary and Joseph and baby Jesus. As they do, they tell any and all who will listen what they were told. YAY! Great story! Turn the page.

We tend to stop here. We close the book and head to Christmas dinner or begin ripping the presents open. But the story isn’t over. Keep reading. All who heard what the Shepherds reported hearing were amazed. Then v19, this verse is challenging, “But Mary treasured all these things, pondering them in her heart.” This young gal took all that has been said to her, Joseph and now the shepherds and treasured them. What do you do with a treasure? A truly valuable treasure? You guard it!

The Jewish people were (are) a storytelling culture. From a noticeably young age, they are told the story of God and of their people. From the very beginning when Adam and Eve were in the Garden – where mankind broke relationship with their God. Throughout many, many generations God used prophets, law and the lives of people to tell His story – the story of restoring relationship. May I point out, the excitement of the shepherds sharing with the people wasn’t what they saw, although spectacular – it was what they heard! When the angel declared to the shepherds “Today in the town of David a Savior is born to you; He is Christ the Lord.” (Lk 2:11) there were keywords used, these Jewish shepherds didn’t miss it! What they heard, slipped into the ongoing story line, and fit perfectly.

Savior is referenced as one who rescues, a Rescuer. Christ is the Anointed One, the Messiah, the One they had been waiting for – the answer! And Lord, (Kurios) was the word the Greek-speaking Hebrews used for God. In essence, the angel’s addition to the story was saying; You’ve been told all your life, the Jewish people were waiting to be rescued, the Messiah, the Answer – is God Himself. And it’s happened!

The angelic choir too adds to the story, “Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace…” Peace. Biblical peace isn’t just the lack of conflict; it is the presence of the rightness of God. It literally means (Eirene in Greek) “to set at one again.” Conveying that once something was upright, but has toppled over (chaos, strife is the result) but when righted and set at one again – peace. Mankind broke relationship with God through sin – God has just sent the answer – His Son Jesus (more historical story to come). Peace isn’t a concept or a feeling, peace is a person.

Mary took ALL this and she pondered it. Her pondering isn’t mere tucking it away and thinking on it now and then. The word Luke uses conveys “putting together.” She connected all the dots. She lined it all up. When all strung together – all the pieces (so far*) fit. Each piece has beauty in itself. But what a glorious bigger story. There is evidence we see later of her pondering. Jesus is a grown man. He, Mary and the disciples are at a wedding. Remember when Jesus turns the water into wine? Mary tells the servants, “Whatever He says to you, do it.” (Jn 2:5). These are the last recorded words of Mary.

Such confidence in the fitted pieces of God. Jesus.

This is an excerpt of the message I recently shared with the women of our church. I challenged us, first, when reading our bibles, don’t stop or skim over the famous or familiar parts, keep reading beyond to the edge of the story. The same Holy Spirit that inspired the writers, inspires we the readers – invite Him to read with us. And second, as we are in this Christmas season, may we truly treasure the bigger story, ponder, keep putting together the great God stuff – be in awe of Him – God’s gracious, loving restoring of relationship, “Today in the town of David a Savior is born to you; He is Christ the Lord.” May our mindset and our last recorded words be the same as pondering Mary – “Whatever He says to you, do it.”

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

*I say “so far” because we know, Jesus had yet to die and resurrect from the dead – a HUGE element yet to be added to the bigger story.

Emmanuel

Emmanuel.  At Christmas time we sing with a resounding “O come, O come Emmanuel…” and it is written in beautiful font lettering across our Christmas cards. Emmanuel (Immanuel*) meaning “God with us.”

Many who attempt to say God is uninterested and doesn’t turn His divine head our way do not understand Emmanuel.  The Creator God didn’t just create and wave Himself off, wishing us good luck.   He is Emmanuel. He has been, He is – with us. He was with Adam and Eve while walking in the Garden in the cool of the day (Genesis 3:8).  He was with Moses and the Israelites in the desert as the pillar of fire by night (Exodus 13:22). He was the fourth man with Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, as the three were in the fire (Daniel 3:24-25).  He was with mankind as Jesus’ sandaled feet walked in Galilee (Matthew 4:18). He is with us, gloriously residing within us (1 Corinthians 3:16).  He is the God who dwells with us, among us and in us – God is Emmanuel.

Fast forward to the New Testament, tucked in the story of the birth of Jesus – Matthew chapter 1:  Joseph is about to take Mary as his wife, (according to cultural tradition, the engagement was a done-deal).  BUT she is pregnant (Hm…) he, a good man, plans to dissolve the marriage quietly as to not disgrace her.  Queue angelic messenger:  Joseph is told to take Mary as his wife.  The baby she carries is of the Holy Spirit. She will have a Son and His name will be Jesus because He will save His people from their sins.  Matthew’s narrative continues: “All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet: The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and   they will call him Immanuel   – which means, “God with us.” (vv 22-23)

God was and is with His people throughout history, but sending His Son, slipping Him into human flesh, all He was, all He did, could not be more unmistakably striking evidence of God’s presence. A sign indeed!  God keeps His promises.  The All-Powerful, All-Sufficient, Sovereign Creator of the universe does not NEED to be with us – He wants to! 

Jesus reveals to John, “the dwelling place of God is with man…”  (Revelation 21:3). Unhindered fellowship with God Himself, the thread of God’s reigning government is “God with us.” 

So beautiful, so comforting – Emmanuel.

Rejoice, rejoice Emmanuel… (sing with me).

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

*Why do we often see two spellings for Immanuel?  The different spellings are due to different vowels used in Hebrew (O.T. “Immanuel”) and Greek (N.T. “Emmanuel”) yet they are indeed the same God presence, just two different languages.

If You Say So

After Jesus had taught from Simon Peters’ boat, (Lk 5) He told him to cast his fishing nets out where it is deeper.  Peter responded they had already fished all night, “But if You say so…”  They put their nets in. The catch was so large, the nets began to break.  Peter had to get other fishermen and their boat to help.  This miraculous catch caused all those observing to be in awe.  Two of these awestruck men were the brothers, James, and John.  Going ashore, they left everything and followed Jesus. *

WHAT IF? (For the sake of making a point). What if Peter had declined to do what Jesus said, “It’s ok, I’m a professional fisherman, I got this” and went about his business? 

WHAT IF? What if Peter delayed his obedience?  Delayed it an hour or two?  “F-I-N-E, I’ll drop the nets.” Perhaps by then James and John (in the other boat) would have been out of ear shot or too far away to help and the nets would have broken – the fish, the great catch, slip away back in to the deep.  Perhaps their delay missed the school of fish that now travels in another direction.

WHAT IF?  What if Peter didn’t go all the way out to deeper water, stopping short, dropping the nets in shallow water.   Yes, he again had let down the nets, but NOT in the deep water.  Reluctant to fully obey – devaluing Jesus’ words.

There is a strong principle for us: OUR obedience to Jesus does not just load up our boats of blessing – it causes others to be in awe – awe of Him.  Our listening and doing what Jesus says (now) can lead ourselves (and others) in redirection to follow Him and leave it all behind. Our obedience is not for us alone.  

May we not decline, delay or devalue what Jesus says. (Our response affects others).

Point to Ponder.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

*Scholars are divided whether this incident is identical with Jesus’ call of these fishermen as recorded in Matthew 4:18-22 and Mark 1:16-20.  Meaning, they all may be telling the same story, with more or less information or from a different angle.  The story above happened about one year after Jesus and Peter’s initial introduction (John 1:35-42).

A Little Less Messy

This world is a mess.  BUT.  You have to love the “but” in God’s economy. The apostle Paul gives list to the evidence of God – in us. We the redeemed.  “But the Holy Spirit produces this kind of fruit in our lives: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.” (Gal 5:22-23a, NLT – emphasis mine). 

Other translations render gentleness as meekness.  Meekness, many know it as “strength under control.”  It is an active and deliberate positive response to an undesirable circumstance. Positive is the key. Although a negative may be merited – positive is the choice. What a good God concept.  Yet it is more. It is responding from the inwrought grace of the soul. Not just the inward grace of the soul, that it dwells there – but INWROUGHT. 

Inwrought is not a word we use much today or use at all. Oh but, it has the most beautiful imagery. It is intricately woven material with a particular pattern. (Of fabric or woodwork, stonework, and metal). It is the adding of another element, working it into the material. Meekness is the evidence of God’s grace worked into our soul. What a lovely delicate yet vibrant embroidery, God’s grace woven in and throughout the pattern of our life. The beauty is that it all becomes one piece of material. To take this additional element out would leave holes – gaping, ripping holes.

HOW do we get this woven into us – to come out?  Come out when our merited moments present themselves – controlled gracious responses? Three words: Holy Spirit and – yoke.

In ancient days, a disciple would attach themselves to a Rabbi.  The Rabbi’s hope was that their disciples would walk close, listen, and learn.  Live as they did.  Each Rabbi would present their teaching, this is known as the Rabbi’s “yoke of Torah.” (their teaching, interpretation, and application). Their disciples would accept it and emulate it. Over the course of the Rabbinic progression through the years, many Rabbi’s would inflate, even create additional commandments. To follow and align with them caused great burden on the disciple.  This sheds light on Jesus’ words, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” (Matt 11:28-30).  Many times, we read Jesus saying, “You have heard it said, but I say to you.” Aside from the current teaching, “I say walk close, listen and learn of …Me.”  Jesus’ burden is light. 

The yoke is a symbol of servitude. When researching the actual yoke and the training of an ox for more understanding, I found that fitting the ox with the yoke, it is BEST that the ox raise its head up into the yoke for the most comfortable and profitable fit. This comes with time and trust, that the animal is willing to voluntarily lift their head to the master. If forced down, the fit could cause irritation, causing the ox to lean, favoring one side and possible altering the direction of their steps.

Yes, this world is a mess.  And we may have merited moments of opportunity from time to time. What a challenge.  A challenge to give the world a good God quality. We are disciples of Jesus. We allow and invite the Spirit’s leading and growth in our lives.  We lift our head up into the yoke – Jesus’ yoke.

Lifting. Making the world a little less messy, one (yielded) opportunity at a time.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

Seasons Unaware

I love autumn, the crisp morning air, and those vibrant yellow, orange and red leaves. I find it fascinating that so much beauty can come from a season of change. 

Seasons. 

With so much uncertainty in the world, there is however a guarantee there WILL be another spring that rolls to summer. Then fall and eventually winter.  Once winter wears out its welcome, according to God’s design spring again bursts forth bringing new life.

The Lord has showed me that just as the environment and atmosphere change, we too experience a change of season. Solomon writes in Ecclesiastes, “There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven.” (3:1) His following list consists of a time for birthing, dying, planting, and harvesting. A time to tear down and a time to build. A time to cry and a time to laugh.  There is even a time for dancing. Oh Yah! 

For some of us our season is lingering. The cold emotional winter drags on, and on and on. Or perhaps something triggers you and an unhealthy season reappears. A season of your life you were confident had passed. Have you ever hopped in the car and after getting underway, you reach for the radio, turning it on, a song comes on and within seconds you ARE THERE!  The song brings back a familiarity either good or one that takes you back to THAT season.  A time when sorrow was your companion. Pain an unwanted friend or a relationship gone wrong. Or you flip the calendar page and there it is – THE month. The one you dread. The month you experienced betrayal or the death of a loved one.

I experienced something similar in early September a year ago. It was a beautiful sunny fall day. I was driving to my granddaughter’s school to pick her up. Once in the parking lot, backing up, parking, stepping out – instantly I stopped …feeling complete dread and sorrow. Then again walking towards the school, I asked God, “WHAT is this?”  He reminded me, that, the same scenario; sunny day, cool and crisp, orange, and red leaves, school buses, and it was HERE!  Here, I received a phone call with very traumatic news.  Sorrowful news – stop in your track’s news.  It was all so familiar in a way that I was not aware of.

With this revelation, I knew this needed to be broken! “In Jesus name!”  I took authority over the familiarity, over the dread, the sorrow. Breaking the emotional AND spiritual hold.  From there I sensed Holy Spirit teaching me about the familiarity of seasons.

God does not want us living in the past.  Each new day is a gift.  If we keep our hands full of the old stuff, there is no room for the new.  And folks we got us some stuff.  And if we are not certain what it is that is overwhelming us – ask Him!

Times and seasons CAN be broken! Daniel praised God saying: “Praise be to the name of God for ever and ever. Wisdom and power are His. He changes the times and the seasons; He removes kings and raises up kings; He gives wisdom to the wise. And knowledge to those who have understanding. He reveals deep and secret things; He knows what is in the darkness, and light dwells with Him.” (2:20-22)

“Oh God, may You reveal to us the seasons we may not be aware of. Seasons we only feel the effects. Perhaps it is time to lay a few things down, empty our hands and wait in expectant joy as You “… change the seasons.”   Break the familiarity in JESUS NAME!  Free us. Let there be no more stop in our tracks unaware – but moving forward with each new day. With NEW stuff in our hands. Amen”

God has new, restoring, healed, healthy seasons.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on towards love & good deeds.” – Hebrews 10:24)

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Amen

“Well that just blew my mind!”  Slang.   Slang has so crept into our vocabulary that we really are not aware of it.  Much of our culture’s speech is informal. Some of what we deem casual has robbed the formal vault of Biblical language.

Amen is such a word. Hebrew in origin. We throw it around too freely (in my opinion) and even haphazardly without understanding its true weighted meaning.   In biblical times when someone responded with “Amen” they were in essence binding themselves to fulfill certain conditions or conditions were now bound to them.  In Deuteronomy 27, on the verge of crossing the Jordan into the Promised Land, the covenant is being reviewed and renewed. Moses offers a list of twelve curses. These statements provide the punishment for disobedience.  As each statement is read, it is to be followed by the “Amen” of the people. Their response expresses their affirmation and acceptance of the justice and judgment of God. They were confirming and invoking fulfillment.   “We know the terms and we will obey and continue to do so, knowing our violation brings consequences.”

Amen literally means, “so be it.”  It is as if slamming the gavel down in a court of law, declaring “TRUTH!” Multiple times when Jesus was speaking, He would declare “For truly…”  Or “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.” (John 3:5, emphasis mine).  This “truly” (or verily) is indeed “amen.”  Truth is being declared. 

Paul as well used the strong gavel declaring amenOh, how great are God’s riches and wisdom and knowledge! How impossible it is for us to understand His decisions and His ways! For who can know the LORD’s thoughts? Who knows enough to give Him advice? And who has given Him so much that He needs to pay it back? For everything comes from Him and exists by His power and is intended for His glory. All glory to Him forever! Amen.”  (Romans 11:33-36, NLT).  This statement is boxed up and labeled – Truth!

Do we really want all that we free and easily declare “Amen” … to be and made binding?  What are we committing to? What are we stating as truth?  May our speech not be so casual that we inadvertently attach ourselves to something we really do not want to.  “Father, ‘set a guard, O LORD, over my mouth, keep watch over the door of my lips.’” (Psalm 141:3) 

Amen.

In Him, DeDe (“Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love & good deeds.” – Hebrew 10:24)